Saturday, March 14, 2020

September 11th Reflection essays

September 11th Reflection essays I remember my mother telling me about her trip to New York last year. She talked about how the city was just how she remembered it: Times Square, Fifth Avenue, yellow taxis as far as the eye can see. Everything was the same except for that odd patch of blue sky that now shined down onto the shops along East 41st street. In the space where the World Trade Center Towers once stood, centerpieces of the storied New York skyline, proudly representing the triumphs of capitalism, little more than shards of metal and dust remained. She told me visiting Ground Zero was a powerful experience for her, looking down at the hulking crater where almost three thousand completely innocent people lost their lives. She said she thought a great deal about all the people who died there, imagining what they were doing as they went to work that day, what it was like trying to flee the buildings, what the firefighters and police officers thought when they were first dispatched to the towers. There were so many people, just going about their everyday lives, all dying for absolutely no reason at all. Now, after a year of reflection, even though Im still hurt by the attacks, its been even more sobering watching our country handle the situation. Everything about 9-11 has been exploited. The media exploited our willingness to watch television 24 hours a day with their incessant coverage and analysis and over-analysis of absolutely everything related to September 11th. Jerry Fallwell exploited our fears by saying the attacks were Gods wrath against the immorality of American society. Bobby Lehman exploited our new-found patriotism to help him sell used cars. The most dangerous product of the September 11 tragedy, though, is the Bush Administrations exploitation of our patriotism to justify an unnecessary war in Iraq and to further policies that endanger many of the freedoms that our attackers sought to destroy. ...

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Pearson's hard soft acid base theory in bioinorganic Term Paper

Pearson's hard soft acid base theory in bioinorganic - Term Paper Example The theory implies that soft acids tend to bind to soft bases and hard acids to hard bases. An increase in the electronegativity of an element or ligand causes an increase in the polarizability; this in turn increases hardness. The theory is useful in predicting the pathways of chemical reactions. The chemical conditions in which a hard or soft base or acid in put in can cause the hardness (or softness) characteristics of the acid or base to change. Therefore, borderline elements and ligands might increase or decrease in hardness or softness depending on the chemical conditions. Because of this reason, the metals in various metalloenzymes may be subjected to chemical conditions that might alter their hardness or softness properties. Enzymes with metals that exhibit Pearson’s hard and soft acids and bases theory include: 1) Urease This is an enzyme with nickel at its active site found in many species of bacteria, algae, plants (such as Jack Bean) and invertebrates. It plays a k ey role in the catalytic hydrolysis of urea to form ammonia and carbon dioxide as pre the equation below: Urease in Jack Bean has a single catalytic unit made up of an ?-subunit that has the active site with a dimeric nickel center. One of the two Ni atoms (Ni-1) coordinates to histidine via the nitrogen atoms and a water molecule. The second Ni atom (Ni-2) is similarly coordinated to histidine via the N atoms, two water molecules and to aspartic acid via the O atom. Mechanism: There are several mechanisms that explain how urease works. These include: a) Zerner mechanism In this, a carbonyl oxygen in urea attacks one of the water ligands attached to Ni-1. A nitrogen atom in the urea molecule donates its lone pair electrons to a carbon atom forming an N=C bond (Dixon, Riddles and Blakeley). This then reacts with a carboxylate ion. A base-catalyzed deprotonation of one –OH ligand on Ni then occurs. The resultant electronegative O attacks the carbonyl carbon. The N=C bond initia lly formed donates two electrons to the nitrogen, cancelling out the charge on it. The intermediate carbon formed with a coordination of 4 is then broken down by a sulfhydryl group. Ammonia is released when the C-N bond is broken after an H atom bonds to the N. This occurs alongside the breaking of the bond between the octahedral nickel and oxygen. A carbamate ion coordinated to the Ni is then formed. Water displaces the carbamate. The resultant carbamate then degenerates to yield carbonic acid and urea. b) Mangani mechanism This mechanism stipulates that both Ni-1 and Ni-2 take part in the reaction. The first atom, Ni-1, binds to urea, causing its activation. The second, Ni-2 binds to a water molecule, causing its activation (Benini, Rypniewski and Wilson). Ni-1 is in a five-coordinate formation, bound to urea via a carbonyl O atom. The distance between the two Ni atoms is reduced by the movement of the urea molecule towards Ni-2. The relatively low Lewis base property of NH2 in ur ea makes it a poor chelating ligand. Its high basicity however, enables the binding to Ni to occur. 2) Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase This is a nickel-based enzyme found in various bacteria. The enzyme plays a role in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide to form carbon dioxide as per the equation below: There are two classes of carbon monoxide hydrogenase enzymes: one has a Mo-[Fe2-S2] active site and the other a Ni-[Fe3-S4]

Monday, February 10, 2020

Intellectual Property Law assignment Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3000 words

Intellectual Property Law assignment - Essay Example A copyrights issue, with regards to ownership and authorship of a book and photographs arises. Who between Burchill, the book author and Justin Timbersnake, the subject of the book, owns the copyright to the book and the photographs? Does Burchill own the rights to the photos of Justin Timberlake she took in the pretence of her personal use and do such rights allow her to publicly distribute the photos in question? As noted, this is purely a question of copyright law; most importantly, The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988 and the Copyright and Related Rights Regulations 2003, No. 2498. In particular, this case is about copyright laws because it touches on moral rights and obligations. In this case, the right of privacy for Justin’s photographs Burchill had taken for her personal use, of which she has now agreed to give to the editor of The Sunday Topical. Secondly, there is the issue of copyright infringement and moral infringement; has the editor of The Sunday Topical infringed on Justin Timbersnake’s rights to the contents of Burchill’s book and photos? It is a fact that Burchill is the author of the book biography of Justin Timbersnake and the photographs she took of Justin while at his mansion. ... Justin Timbersnake should not sue The Sun Topical for serialising the book since they have not in any way infringed on his copyright since Burchill owns the authorship rights. However, Timbersnake can go ahead and sue Burchill for giving his private photos to The Sun Topical for public display. Likewise, as the facts of this case those outlined above are concerned; the relevant law to this case is the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988, specifically in relation to authorship, ownership, infringements, moral rights and privacy. Based on the facts of the case, it is imperative that the issue of ownership of the book and of the photography needs to be established. It is also beneficial to determine whether, by allowing Burchill access to his personal diary, Justin Timbersnake’s granted or transferred his copyrights of the diary to Burchill. If there was an assignment or transfer of copyright ownership, it will be important to find out whether there is a written documentatio n signed by or on behalf of the assignor. Another issue that needs determining is the nature of relationship between Burchill and Justine Timbersnake with regards to both the photography and the book; was Burchill employed by Justin when she took the photographs? Or did Justin ask or commission her to write the book on his life? These questions help in determining the first owner of the copyright with regards to both the photographs and the book. In addition to solving the issue of copyright ownership and authorship, it is important that the issue of infringement is looked at. Determining whether liability exists is also important as is the issues of remedies in terms of damages and or criminal

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Math Anxiety Essay Example for Free

Math Anxiety Essay Math anxiety is a common attribute of many children and adults. It usually happens when a person is unprepared to be tested and when a student becomes frustrated from not knowing how to do mathematic operations. Students experience anxiety at different levels. For some, it may be a feeling of uneasiness and for others, it can consume them with feelings of a panic attack. For some people, just walking into a math class can start the math anxiety cycle. One might think that this only happens to students in public or private schools. However, even home-schooled students report that they have felt anxiety while studying math at home. Math anxiety can make a person feel as if they are paralyzed. A feeling of panic and paranoia can lead to a lack of confidence and a strong feeling of fear. A student sometimes begins to display passive behavior. The panic feeling discussed in the first paragraph is when the student feels helpless and cannot find a way to get rid of it. Paranoia is when the mind of the student tells the student that he/she will not be able to complete the math work – whether it is easy or difficult math work. Passive behavior is when the student feels as if he will never be able to understand math or feel any level of comfort when working with math. Therefore, students give up and then put forth no effort. But, probably the most common attribute of math anxiety is the lack of confidence a student feels when math is presented to him/her. When the student expects that he will never know the answer to the question, then he will probably spend most of his efforts in second guessing. Math anxiety is present in every classroom and every teacher wants to know how to get the â€Å"Math anxiety monster† out of the room. Once he is gone, math instruction can begin!

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

The Underground Railroad Essay -- UGRR Slavery

Introduction Imagine yourself a slave, hungry, beaten, and sick with grief at having had your freedom, family and all that makes you human stripped from you. But then, you get word of a way out of it all. It will separate you from all whom you love, it will endanger your life, but that is the price for freedom from the slavery of the south. Fellow slaves begin acting strangely, gathering tools, clothing, and food. You look around, and all you see is a freshly washed quilt hanging out to dry. Then you begin to realize that there is a new quilt every few days, each with a new pattern, and with each quilt, your fellow slaves correspondingly perform more and more preparative tasks. So you join them, realizing this is your only chance to become human again, your chance to dupe the system and win your freedom as the ultimate prize. Finally, now that you’ve caught on to the messages contained in the quilts and spiritual songs, you see that long awaited pattern, â€Å"tumbling boxes,† and you don’t look back. From here on out, it is all relying on your instincts, and your wit. There are people that will help you, but twice as many that want to kill you. Good luck and god-speed, you have just joined the Underground Railroad, see you in Canada! The Underground Railroad was neither a railroad nor underground. It was a complex network of freed slaves, black sympathizers, and northern abolitionists. Famous names that adorned the railroad were Harriet Tubman, William Still, and Frederick Douglass, to name a few. In the heart of the South, there was an informal, yet highly complex system evolving. The institution of slavery had wrenched the hearts of too many, and now they were quietly rebelling. Named during the steam engin... ...W. Norton & Company, 1996 Siebert, Wilber H. The Undergound Railroad from Slavery to Freedom New York: Russell & Russell, 1898 Tobin, Jacquline L. Hidden in Plain View New York: Doubleday, 1999 Internet Sources: http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/travel/underground/ http://afroamhistory.about.com/ http://www.inform.umd.edu/EdRes/Topic/Diversity/Specific/Race/Specific/African_American_Resources/Bibliographies/ugrrbib.html http://www.cr.nps.gov/aahistory/ http://www.geneseo.edu/~brl1/Photos.html http://jfg.girlscouts.org/Talk/whoami/Culture/AfricanAmerican/FreedomSquares2.htm#Crossroads http://www.histori.ca/search.do?config=htdig-en&words=underground+railroad http://www.state.vt.us/vhs/educate/urbiblio.htm http://www.ugrr.org

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Dream Act

Education is a benefit for society. Higher education offers higher economic advantages for both workers and the economy. The United States is the home of about 65,000 undocumented children who graduate high school each year and have lived in the country for more than five years (Dreams Deferred, 2010). These children are intelligent, outstanding class presidents, valedictorians, and honor students who aspire to be successful doctors, engineers, teachers, and lawyers.However, because of legal and financial obstacles confronting them just because they are undocumented students, many are unable to live their American dream and attend a college or university. It is estimated that only about 5 to 10% of undocumented high school graduates go on to college (Dreams Deferred, 2010). According to the Immigration Policy Center, â€Å"Studies of undocumented immigrants who legalized their status through the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 reveal that legal status brings fiscal , economic, and labor-market benefits to individual immigrants, their families, and U.S. society in general† (Dreams Deferred, 2010). The U. S. Department of Labor found that wages of these immigrants who received their legal status under IRCA increased their wages to 15% five years later. If given the opportunity, undocumented students will expand their education, get better jobs, and pay taxes. The Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act is a proposed federal legislation in the U. S. that will enact two major changes in current law.The DREAM Act will 1) â€Å"Permit certain immigrant students who have grown up in the U. S. to apply legal status and to eventually obtain permanent status and become eligible for U. S. citizenship if they go to college or serve in the U. S. military; and 2) Eliminate a federal provision that penalizes states that provide in-state tuition without regard to immigration status. † (DREAM Act: Summary, 2, 2010)The passa ge of the DREAM Act is critical to raise the quality of the U.S. workforce through higher education to maintain a strong economy. The DREAM Act will increase the number of undocumented immigrant students who attend college, it will benefit the nation’s economy, and the nation will save the high cost of ignoring these undocumented immigrant students. The Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act is a bipartisan legislation led by senators Richard Durbin, Chuck Hagel, andRichard Lugar, this bill will restore states’ rights to offer in-state tuition to undocumented immigrant students who live in that state in order to make it easier for students to afford a higher level education. The DREAM Act will also provide citizenship to the hardworking immigrant youth who was brought to the U. S. as children and who pursue a higher education or military service, allowing them to contribute to the American society (Basic Facts about In-State Tuition for Undocum ented Immigrant Students, 2006).The bill has been introduced several times in the House of Representatives and the Senate, but it has never been brought to a floor vote. In the senate it was brought to debate on October 24, 2007, but failed by a 52-44 vote. The DREAM Act was reintroduced on March 26, 2009 by Richard Durbin and Richard Lugar in the senate and in the House of Representatives by Howard Berman, Lincoln Diaz, and Lucille Roybal-Allard (DREAM Act: Summary, 2010). To qualify, a DREAM Act beneficiary would have to meet the following requirements: * Proof of having arrived to the U.S. at the age of 15 or younger. * Proof of residence in the U. S. for at least 5 consecutive years since the date of their arrival. * Must be between the age of 12 and 35 at the time of the enactment of the bill. * Have graduated from an American high school, or obtained a GED. * Display â€Å"Good Moral Character† defined as â€Å"the absence of significant criminal record or any major ch arge of drugs† by the National Council of La Raza (The ‘DREAM Act’ and the ‘American Dream Act, 1, 2007). The student must have accomplished one of the following within six year after the permanent residence was granted: * Earn a degree from a 2 or 4 year institution, or have maintained a â€Å"good standing† for at least two years at a 2 or 4 year institution while working toward a bachelor’s degree or higher (The ‘DREAM Act’ and the ‘American Dream Act, 2007). * Served in the U. S. Armed Forces for at least 2 years. Without the DREAM Act the U. S. faces critical financial and emotional costs.After years of hard work and achieving success in high school every student in America expects a reward. 65,000 undocumented students currently living in America expect these rewards as well. They were raised the American way. According to the National Council of La Raza, the American way is to â€Å"offer equal opportunities to all an d encourage all to make the most of their talents† (The ‘DREAM Act’ and the ‘American Dream Act, 2, 2007). As young children, these students were brought to this nation by their parents; it was beyond their control to stay in their native land.Brenda Garcia states, her family faced monetary problems while living in Mexico, the only solution to their problem was to come to the United States, she had no say so in this decision and was forced to follow her parents and leave her country (2010). These students have shared all the American values and traditions; they see this country as their home. These students grew up pledging allegiance to the United States of America, and now the United States of America can’t give its loyalists the opportunity for citizenship and a more affordable higher level education.Current law punishes these students for a decision they did not make and for their lack of documentation. America has imposed insuperable obstacles fo r these students and crushed their hopes of exceeding in their education, as a result â€Å"only 5 to 10 percent of undocumented young people who graduate from high school go on to college† (Basic Facts about In-State Tuition for Undocumented Immigrant Students, 2, 2006) either because schools deny them admission, they are charged out-of state tuition which is much more than the in-state tuition rate, they are not eligible for financial aid, and cannot work legally in the United States.The discouragement is too much and most of these hard working, and goal oriented undocumented students with high academic standing don’t get to live their American dream. With the passage of the DREAM Act these student’s dreams could be attainable and as a result more students could attend college, exceed in their education, and contribute to the United States economy. The DREAM Act will â€Å"facilitate access to college for immigrant students in the U.S. by restoring statesâ₠¬â„¢ rights to offer in-state tuition to immigrant students residing in their state,† states the National Council of La Raza (The ‘DREAM Act’ and the ‘American Dream Act, 1, 2007). Many states argue that the schools will not have revenue if undocumented students are charged only in-state tuition, but who said in-state tuition meant free tuition? â€Å"In-state tuition is not the same as free tuition.It is a discount,† claims the National Immigration Law Center (Basic Facts about In-State Tuition for Undocumented Immigrant Students, 2, 2006) if the discount is provided, more undocumented students will attend an institution of higher level education and the money paid by these students will increase school revenues by far because it will be money that would otherwise not be there, and even then, after all, education pays for itself, claims the National Immigration Law Center (Basic Facts about In-State Tuition for Undocumented Immigrant Students, 3, 200 6).The United States’ economic future depends on its current students, documented and undocumented. If given the opportunity, through the DREAM Act, undocumented students will expand their education and raise the schools revenues; they will get better jobs in which they will help out the U. S. society by curing the ill, sharing their knowledge with young people, designing new buildings for the community, and opening new businesses, etc.The National Immigration Law Center claims that â€Å"As baby boomers age, the number of retirees in the U. S. swell (Basic Facts about In-State Tuition for Undocumented Immigrant Students, 2, 2006) and that’s why in the future the U. S. will need new proficient people to take over those jobs. These young immigrants can be the future professionals the U. S. will need, they are â€Å"key to our ability to counteract the serious demographic challenges we face† (Basic Facts about In-State Tuition for Undocumented Immigrant Students, 2, 2006).We as a nation must â€Å"raise the caliber of our workforce through higher education to have a chance to maintain a strong economy† (Basic Facts about In-State Tuition for Undocumented Immigrant Students, 2, 2006). Additionally each person who attends college and obtains a professional job means one less expense to the state in terms of social service, as well, an asset in terms of tax payments to the state. The nation cannot burden these motivated and high achieving immigrant youth; after all they will only benefit the nation in the future.Undocumented students who don’t have the opportunity to get the best out of their education are simply wasted talent, a new report from the Immigration Policy Center by Roberto Gonzalez, Wasted Talent and Broken Dreams: The Lost Potential of Undocumented Students, makes it clear that â€Å"without means to legalize their status, these children are seldom able to go on to college, cannot work legally in the United States, and therefore cannot put their educations to good use† (Dreams Deferred, 1, 2010).The United States has invested in the education of these undocumented students since they were in pre-kinder all the way through their high school education. If the United States cuts their education short by not gathering the full potential of these children’s’ education it will face an enormous cost because there will be no benefits for the nation. In the future these tudents will not give back to the nation, and that will be a result of waste talent, wasted money, and lost potential. Why not let these students contribute back to the country that gave them so much? The American way is to be fair and offer equal opportunities to all and encourage everyone to make the best out of their talents, America, now is the time to live up to your American way. Don’t punish these undocumented students for a decision that they did not make.These students are your children, they are Ame ricans, they are friends, classmates, outstanding students, they are family. There is a significant cost in denying these children their college education. Don’t crush their American Dream. â€Å"This wasted talent imposes financial and emotional costs not only on undocumented students themselves, but on the U. S. economy and U. S. society as a whole† (Dreams Deferred, 1, 2010). Dream Act Cynthia Nguyen Ms. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011 â€Å"Amy's Story. † Immigration and Multiculturalism: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth Lerner, and Adrienne Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. 329-333. Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. Definition/Background History: The IRCA (Immigration and Reform Control Act) was introduced in 1986, this act enabled immigrants who came to America illegally residency and citizenship. The widespread amount of illegal immigrants caused border controls for those who are foreigners.Unfortunately Amy, an anonymous illegal immigrant, and her family surpassed the deadline by three and a half weeks. Amy tells her story about her family and financial struggles due to being an undocumented immigrant. She faced out-of-state tuition fees because of college requirements of being resident in the United States. Hiding undercover pretending to be a citizen was becoming tough for Amy so she had to drop out of school. Now she tutors and has low-paid jobs to support her parents and herself. Cynthia Nguyen Ms. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011Bennion, David. â€Å"Undocumented Youths Organize to Pass DREAM Act. † Legal Intelligencer. 31 Aug 2009. Print. David Bennion. â€Å"Children of Illegal Aliens Should Go to College and Gain Legal Status. † â€Å"What Rights Should Illegal Immigrants Have? † Noel Merino, Ed. At Issue Series. Greenhaven Press, 2010. Opposing Viewpoints. Web. 9 Nov. 2011. Positive Effect: David Bennion, an immigration attorney at Nationalities Service Center in Philadelphia, stated: â€Å"Each year, about 65,000 undocumented students graduate from high school in the United States.They then face often insurmountable barriers to pursuing further education or employment opportunities. † By passing the DREAM Act the amount of undocumented immigrants that are already living in America could help the economy and prosper in education and em ployment. Negative Effect: Keeping the act repealed is beneficial because the amount of illegal immigrants in America could incline. By permitting the â€Å"Dreamers† to pay in-state-college tuition and become a citizen of U. S. would promote more illegal immigrants into America. Cynthia NguyenMs. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011 â€Å"Dream on. † America 19 July 2010: 5. Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. Positive Effects: President Obama reignited the idea of allowing illegal immigrants education and ability to attend colleges under certain circumstances written in the DREAM Act. He states â€Å"We should stop punishing innocent young people for the actions of their parents by denying them the chance to stay here and earn an education and contribute their talents to build the country where they’ve grown up. With this idea, this allows the children who are documented an opportunity to succeed in the United States not only for themselves , but our economy as well. Cynthia Nguyen Ms. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011 Ling-Ling, Yeh. â€Å"The Dream for Some, a Nightmare for the Rest. † The Daily Californian. 19 Oct 2007. Print. Yeh Ling-Ling. â€Å"Children of Illegal Aliens Should Not Go to College and Gail Legal Status. † â€Å"What Rights Should Illegal Immigrants Have? † Noel Merino, Ed. At Issue Series. Greenhaven Press. 2010. Print. Opposing Viewpoints. Web. 9 Nov. 2011. Undesirable Effects:Yeh Ling-Ling an executive director of the Diversity Alliance for a Sustainable America, and an immigrant states â€Å"Passing the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act, or DREAM Act, is a bad idea. Allowing illegal immigrant students to pay in-state college tuition and gain residency would only encourage more illegal immigrants in the United States. The act would have a negative economic impact and hurt American citizens. † Passing the Dream Act would economically stress our f unds because in reality most illegal immigrants are low-paid and cannot afford to pay taxes.The amount of children in American public education would rise. â€Å"This cost can exceed $9,500 per child per year if the student receives the so-called bilingual education, not to mention the costs of other social services. † By accepting this act, it would be a reward to illegal immigrants and would cause more to migrate to America. The Dream Act would negatively effect politics as well. For example, Hispanic activists encourage the pressuring of the United States to be identical as Mexico. This factor effects the future of millions of our nation.Not only politics would be effected but, â€Å"The U. S. population has quadrupled since 1900, from 76 million to 303 million. In the last 15 years alone,over 50 million people have been added to the United States mostly due to immigration-derived growth! If our population continues to grow at the rate of last decade, by 2100—withi n the lifetimes of today's children's children—the United States will have India's current population. † Cynthia Nguyen Ms. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011 â€Å"Illegal Immigrants. Current Issues: Macmillian Social Science Library. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 9 Nov. 2011. Definition/History/Background: â€Å"An immigrant is a person who migrates from one country to another. An â€Å"illegal† immigrant is a person who does so without following the established legal procedures of the destination country and who resides in that country without proper visas or other documents. Illegal immigrants are sometimes referred to as â€Å"illegal aliens† or â€Å"undocumented workers. † Most illegal immigrants of the United States come from Mexico by crossing the 1,955-mile border or the northern border with Canada. Desirable: Economic effects of immigrants can be positive. Illegal immigrants are more open to low-wage jo bs because without paperwork they are not allowed to apply for a job. â€Å"†¦ immigrants take on hard and dangerous jobs that native Americans will not do. These defenders maintain that immigrants’ labor and entrepreneurship helps to revitalize American industries and create more jobs than they take. † Undesirable:For the people who do pay taxes, immigrants are expensive to have. â€Å"The study concluded that taxpayers were paying $4 billion annually in unemployment, medical, educational, and other government programs and services. † Cynthia Nguyen Ms. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011 Texier, Le Emmanuelle. â€Å"The Debate for In-State Tuition Fees Regardless of Immigration Status: The Right to Educate. † La Prensa San Diego 9 May 2003. Print. Emmanuelle Le Texier. â€Å"Undocumented Immigrants Are Entitled to In-State Tuition. † Lori Newman Ed. At Issues Series. Greenhaven Press, 2006.Opposing Viewpoints. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. Positive Eff ects: Enabling illegal immigrants to continue with education formulates a chain reaction to the economy’s rise. Educating a large portion of our country promotes skilled workers, in which help with building a better future for America. Students have not done anything to harm our economy. No matter illegal, or not the children are the future of America and should be rewarded by the ability to fulfill higher education. Allowing this higher education promotes more skilled workers â€Å"building the future of a country. † Dream Act Cynthia Nguyen Ms. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011 â€Å"Amy's Story. † Immigration and Multiculturalism: Essential Primary Sources. Ed. K. Lee Lerner, Brenda Wilmoth Lerner, and Adrienne Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2006. 329-333. Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. Definition/Background History: The IRCA (Immigration and Reform Control Act) was introduced in 1986, this act enabled immigrants who came to America illegally residency and citizenship. The widespread amount of illegal immigrants caused border controls for those who are foreigners.Unfortunately Amy, an anonymous illegal immigrant, and her family surpassed the deadline by three and a half weeks. Amy tells her story about her family and financial struggles due to being an undocumented immigrant. She faced out-of-state tuition fees because of college requirements of being resident in the United States. Hiding undercover pretending to be a citizen was becoming tough for Amy so she had to drop out of school. Now she tutors and has low-paid jobs to support her parents and herself. Cynthia Nguyen Ms. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011Bennion, David. â€Å"Undocumented Youths Organize to Pass DREAM Act. † Legal Intelligencer. 31 Aug 2009. Print. David Bennion. â€Å"Children of Illegal Aliens Should Go to College and Gain Legal Status. † â€Å"What Rights Should Illegal Immigrants Have? † Noel Merino, Ed. At Issue Series. Greenhaven Press, 2010. Opposing Viewpoints. Web. 9 Nov. 2011. Positive Effect: David Bennion, an immigration attorney at Nationalities Service Center in Philadelphia, stated: â€Å"Each year, about 65,000 undocumented students graduate from high school in the United States.They then face often insurmountable barriers to pursuing further education or employment opportunities. † By passing the DREAM Act the amount of undocumented immigrants that are already living in America could help the economy and prosper in education and em ployment. Negative Effect: Keeping the act repealed is beneficial because the amount of illegal immigrants in America could incline. By permitting the â€Å"Dreamers† to pay in-state-college tuition and become a citizen of U. S. would promote more illegal immigrants into America. Cynthia NguyenMs. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011 â€Å"Dream on. † America 19 July 2010: 5. Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. Positive Effects: President Obama reignited the idea of allowing illegal immigrants education and ability to attend colleges under certain circumstances written in the DREAM Act. He states â€Å"We should stop punishing innocent young people for the actions of their parents by denying them the chance to stay here and earn an education and contribute their talents to build the country where they’ve grown up. With this idea, this allows the children who are documented an opportunity to succeed in the United States not only for themselves , but our economy as well. Cynthia Nguyen Ms. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011 Ling-Ling, Yeh. â€Å"The Dream for Some, a Nightmare for the Rest. † The Daily Californian. 19 Oct 2007. Print. Yeh Ling-Ling. â€Å"Children of Illegal Aliens Should Not Go to College and Gail Legal Status. † â€Å"What Rights Should Illegal Immigrants Have? † Noel Merino, Ed. At Issue Series. Greenhaven Press. 2010. Print. Opposing Viewpoints. Web. 9 Nov. 2011. Undesirable Effects:Yeh Ling-Ling an executive director of the Diversity Alliance for a Sustainable America, and an immigrant states â€Å"Passing the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act, or DREAM Act, is a bad idea. Allowing illegal immigrant students to pay in-state college tuition and gain residency would only encourage more illegal immigrants in the United States. The act would have a negative economic impact and hurt American citizens. † Passing the Dream Act would economically stress our f unds because in reality most illegal immigrants are low-paid and cannot afford to pay taxes.The amount of children in American public education would rise. â€Å"This cost can exceed $9,500 per child per year if the student receives the so-called bilingual education, not to mention the costs of other social services. † By accepting this act, it would be a reward to illegal immigrants and would cause more to migrate to America. The Dream Act would negatively effect politics as well. For example, Hispanic activists encourage the pressuring of the United States to be identical as Mexico. This factor effects the future of millions of our nation.Not only politics would be effected but, â€Å"The U. S. population has quadrupled since 1900, from 76 million to 303 million. In the last 15 years alone,over 50 million people have been added to the United States mostly due to immigration-derived growth! If our population continues to grow at the rate of last decade, by 2100—withi n the lifetimes of today's children's children—the United States will have India's current population. † Cynthia Nguyen Ms. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011 â€Å"Illegal Immigrants. Current Issues: Macmillian Social Science Library. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 9 Nov. 2011. Definition/History/Background: â€Å"An immigrant is a person who migrates from one country to another. An â€Å"illegal† immigrant is a person who does so without following the established legal procedures of the destination country and who resides in that country without proper visas or other documents. Illegal immigrants are sometimes referred to as â€Å"illegal aliens† or â€Å"undocumented workers. † Most illegal immigrants of the United States come from Mexico by crossing the 1,955-mile border or the northern border with Canada. Desirable: Economic effects of immigrants can be positive. Illegal immigrants are more open to low-wage jo bs because without paperwork they are not allowed to apply for a job. â€Å"†¦ immigrants take on hard and dangerous jobs that native Americans will not do. These defenders maintain that immigrants’ labor and entrepreneurship helps to revitalize American industries and create more jobs than they take. † Undesirable:For the people who do pay taxes, immigrants are expensive to have. â€Å"The study concluded that taxpayers were paying $4 billion annually in unemployment, medical, educational, and other government programs and services. † Cynthia Nguyen Ms. Thompson ENC 1101 November 28, 2011 Texier, Le Emmanuelle. â€Å"The Debate for In-State Tuition Fees Regardless of Immigration Status: The Right to Educate. † La Prensa San Diego 9 May 2003. Print. Emmanuelle Le Texier. â€Å"Undocumented Immigrants Are Entitled to In-State Tuition. † Lori Newman Ed. At Issues Series. Greenhaven Press, 2006.Opposing Viewpoints. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. Positive Eff ects: Enabling illegal immigrants to continue with education formulates a chain reaction to the economy’s rise. Educating a large portion of our country promotes skilled workers, in which help with building a better future for America. Students have not done anything to harm our economy. No matter illegal, or not the children are the future of America and should be rewarded by the ability to fulfill higher education. Allowing this higher education promotes more skilled workers â€Å"building the future of a country. †

Monday, January 6, 2020

Essay about Analysis of the Discourse and Rhetoric since...

September 11, 2001. After terrorists hijacked four American airliners, toppling the World Trade Center in New York and damaging the Pentagon just outside Washington, rhetoric in various circles of the West among authors, theorists, and pundits centered around a number of interesting topics. The nature of evil has become a topic over which much debate and rhetoric has ensued. Some have used it as a means by which they can explain these actions, whereas others see it as an obstacle to a proper explanation. Even others see it as false, but a necessary falsehood for the war effort. Furthermore, the debate over if, or the extent to which, United States and Western foreign policy contributed to these attacks has also stirred passions on†¦show more content†¦Reverend Graham is a popular Protestant and generally conservative figure. He said during the memorial service for the victims of September 11: â€Å"But how do we understand something like this? Why does God allow evil like this to take place? Perhaps that is what you are asking now. You may even be angry at God. I want to assure you that God understands these feelings that you may have† (Graham). For Graham, the use of the term evil is not intended to help Americans understand the actions. Rather, he says, â€Å"We are reminded of the mystery and reality of evil.† I have been asked hundreds of times in my life why God allows tragedy and suffering. I have to confess that I really do not know the answer totally, even to my own satisfaction. I have to accept, by faith, that God is sovereign, and He’s a God of love and mercy and compassion in the midst of suffering. The Bible says that God is not the author of evil. It speaks of evil as a â€Å"mystery.† In 2 Thessalonians 2:7 it talks about the mystery of iniquity. The Old Testament prophet Jeremiah said, â€Å"The heart is deceitful above all things and beyond cure. Who can understand it?† He asked that question, â€Å"Who can understand it?† And that’s one reason we each need God in our lives. Reverend Graham’s use of rhetoric is a tactic employed frequently by evangelists and those speaking from a Christian discourse. His citation of the Second Epistle to the Thessalonians is particularly interesting. In theShow MoreRelatedThe Saturn Myth As A Type Of Meta Structure740 Words   |  3 Pages It may be possible, if the monstrous rhetoric could be traced to its origin, to establish a type of meta-structure by which to identify uses of language and metaphor which rely on the monstrous to create difference or marginality. A brief look into the European origins of cannibalism, not as a practice but as a metaphorical construction, leads back to the Saturn myth. Again, Zika notes the use of the Saturn myth as the â€Å"explicit basis for [the] association between witch and cannibal,† and notesRead More George W. 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